Interactive Migration Map

   
    N
orth America’s Boreal Forest
    
A Global Treasure and Haven for Birds
  
Click a bird to view individual routes



© Kevin T. Karlson

Blackpoll Warbler
Dendroica striata



© Lang Elliot
Bay-breasted Warbler
Dendroica castanea



© John Kormendy
Cape May Warbler
Dendroica tigrina



© Ralph Paonessa
Hudsonian Godwit
Limosa haemastica



© Ralph Paonessa
Smith's Longspur
Calcarius pictus




© Kevin T. Karlson
Swainson's Hawk
Buteo swainsoni



© Ralph Paonessa
Pacific Loon
Gavia pacifica




© USFWS
Whooping Crane
Grus americana



© Ducks Unlimited
Barrow's Goldeneye
Bucephala islandica

Stretching from Alaska across Canada, the vast Boreal Forest is one of the largest unspoiled forest ecosystems remaining on Earth. Many of the birds that migrate through or winter in our yards and neighborhoods breed in North American Boreal Forest.

Approximately 327 bird species regularly occur in the Boreal – that’s nearly 50% of the species found in the U.S. and Canada! And 90% of those species migrate to or through the Continental U.S. for the winter.
Up to 3 billion warblers, thrushes, sparrows, flycatchers, hawks and other land birds breed in the Boreal and up to 5 billion - adults and their new young - migrate south from the Boreal each fall. Of these almost 1 billion stay in the U.S. for the winter.
30% of North America's landbirds (3 billion) 40% of North America's waterfowl (26 million) and 30% of its shorebirds (seven million) nest in the wetlands of the Boreal Forest.
   Map created by eNature/NWF supported by The Pew Charitable Trusts 

Boreal Songbird
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Map created by eNature/NWF and supported by The Pew Charitable Trusts

 

Banner photo credit: CPAWS Wildlands League